Causes And Effects Of Noise Pollution Pdf

causes and effects of noise pollution pdf

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What are the health effects of noise pollution?

Noise health effects are the physical and psychological health consequences of regular exposure to consistent elevated sound levels. Noise from traffic, in particular, is considered by the World Health Organization to be one of the worst environmental stressors for humans, second only to air pollution. Although age-related health effects presbycusis occur naturally with age, [5] in many countries the cumulative impact of noise is sufficient to impair the hearing of a large fraction of the population over the course of a lifetime. Adverse cardiovascular effects occur from chronic exposure to noise due to the sympathetic nervous system's inability to habituate. The sympathetic nervous system maintains lighter stages of sleep when the body is exposed to noise, which does not allow blood pressure to follow the normal rise and fall cycle of an undisturbed circadian rhythm. Stress from time spent around elevated noise levels has been linked with increased workplace accident rates and aggression and other anti-social behaviors.

Noise pollution

The Clean Air Act Amendments added a new title IV, relating to acid deposition control, without repealing the existing title IV, relating to noise pollution. The U. This page has links to Clean Air Act sections that are part of the U. Code Collection maintained by the U. Government Publishing Office.

Health effects from noise

Most of us are accustomed to the sounds we hear every day. However, when the sound of the television keeps you from sleeping all night or the traffic starts giving you a headache, it transcends the boundaries of mere noise and qualifies as noise pollution. However, the noise that tends to disrupt the natural rhythm of life makes for one of the biggest pollutants.

Background: Tens of millions of Americans suffer from a range of adverse health outcomes due to noise exposure, including heart disease and hearing loss. Reducing environmental noise pollution is achievable and consistent with national prevention goals, yet there is no national plan to reduce environmental noise pollution. Objectives: We aimed to describe some of the most serious health effects associated with noise, summarize exposures from several highly prevalent noise sources based on published estimates as well as extrapolations made using these estimates, and lay out proven mechanisms and strategies to reduce noise by incorporating scientific insight and technological innovations into existing public health infrastructure. Tens of millions more may be at risk of heart disease, and other noise-related health effects. Direct regulation, altering the informational environment, and altering the built environment are the least costly, most logistically feasible, and most effective noise reduction interventions.

Environmental Noise Pollution in the United States: Developing an Effective Public Health Response

Image adapted from: cocoparisienne; CC0. Well, maybe. Exposure to prolonged or excessive noise has been shown to cause a range of health problems ranging from stress, poor concentration, productivity losses in the workplace, and communication difficulties and fatigue from lack of sleep, to more serious issues such as cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, tinnitus and hearing loss. This study collated data from various large-scale epidemiological studies of environmental noise in Western Europe, collected over a year period. The studies analysed environmental noise from planes, trains and vehicles, as well as other city sources, and then looked at links to health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, sleep disturbance, tinnitus, cognitive impairment in children, and annoyance.

As the world becomes more urbanized, the use of machine-technology increases, and levels of development become higher and more complex, human exposure to noise increases. One authority estimates that the average noise level in the American city is increasing by 1 dB annually. Despite the importance and great scale of the problem, geographers generally have ignored the field of noise pollution research, perhaps because specialized equipment is necessary to accumulate the data required for analysis.


Noise pollution can cause headaches, high blood pressure, respiratory agitation, racing pulse, and, in exposure to extremely loud, constant noise, gastritis, colitis.


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Noise pollution , unwanted or excessive sound that can have deleterious effects on human health, wildlife, and environmental quality. Noise pollution is commonly generated inside many industrial facilities and some other workplaces, but it also comes from highway, railway, and airplane traffic and from outdoor construction activities. Sound waves are vibrations of air molecules carried from a noise source to the ear. Sound is typically described in terms of the loudness amplitude and the pitch frequency of the wave. Loudness also called sound pressure level, or SPL is measured in logarithmic units called decibels dB. The normal human ear can detect sounds that range between 0 dB hearing threshold and about dB, with sounds between dB and dB causing pain pain threshold. The ambient SPL in a library is about 35 dB, while that inside a moving bus or subway train is roughly 85 dB; building construction activities can generate SPLs as high as dB at the source.

Atmospheric pollution is not the only type of contamination that is harming living beings on the planet. And according to the European Environment Agency EEA , noise is responsible for 16, premature deaths and more than 72, hospitalisations every year in Europe alone. According to the WHO, noise is harmful when it exceeds 75 decibels dB and feels painful at levels above dB. Drivers honking the horn, groups of workers drilling the road surface, aircraft flying over us in the sky Noise, noise and more noise. Cities have become the epicentre of a type of pollution, acoustics, which, although its invisibility and the fact that coronavirus crisis reduced it until almost yearn it, is severely damaging to human beings. So much so that the European Environment Agency estimates that noise is responsible for 72, hospital admissions and 16, premature deaths every year in Europe alone.

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