Distinguish Between Inductive And Deductive Reasoning Pdf

distinguish between inductive and deductive reasoning pdf

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Difference between Inductive and Deductive reasoning

During the scientific process, deductive reasoning is used to reach a logical true conclusion. Another type of reasoning, inductive, is also used. Often, people confuse deductive reasoning with inductive reasoning, and vice versa. It is important to learn the meaning of each type of reasoning so that proper logic can be identified. Deductive reasoning is a basic form of valid reasoning.

Deductive and Inductive Logic in Arguments

When assessing the quality of an argument , we ask how well its premises support its conclusion. More specifically, we ask whether the argument is either deductively valid or inductively strong. An argument in which the premises do succeed in guaranteeing the conclusion is called a deductively valid argument. If a valid argument has true premises, then the argument is said also to be sound. All arguments are either valid or invalid, and either sound or unsound; there is no middle ground, such as being somewhat valid. The two premises of this argument would, if true, guarantee the truth of the conclusion. However, we have been given no information that would enable us to decide whether the two premises are both true, so we cannot assess whether the argument is deductively sound.

In logic, we often refer to the two broad methods of reasoning as the deductive and inductive approaches. Deductive reasoning works from the more general to the more specific. We might begin with thinking up a theory about our topic of interest. We then narrow that down into more specific hypotheses that we can test. We narrow down even further when we collect observations to address the hypotheses. This ultimately leads us to be able to test the hypotheses with specific data — a confirmation or not of our original theories.

In the study of logical reasoning, arguments can be separated into two categories: deductive and inductive. Deductive reasoning is sometimes described as a "top-down" form of logic, while inductive reasoning is considered "bottom-up. A deductive argument is one in which true premises guarantee a true conclusion. In other words, it is impossible for the premises to be true but the conclusion false. Thus, the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises and inferences.

Inductive vs. deductive reasoning

Deductive reasoning uses given information, premises or accepted general rules to reach a proven conclusion. On the other hand, inductive logic or reasoning involves making generalizations based upon behavior observed in specific cases. Deductive arguments are either valid or invalid. But inductive logic allows for the conclusions to be wrong even if the premises upon which it is based are correct.

Reasoning in artificial intelligence has two important forms, Inductive reasoning, and Deductive reasoning. Both reasoning forms have premises and conclusions, but both reasoning are contradictory to each other. Following is a list for comparison between inductive and deductive reasoning:. The differences between inductive and deductive can be explained using the below diagram on the basis of arguments:.

Inductive & deductive reasoning

Most everyone who thinks about how to solve problems in a formal way has run across the concepts of deductive and inductive reasoning. Both deduction and induction help us navigate real-world problems, such as who committed a crime, the most likely cause of an accident, or how many planets might contain life in the Milky Way galaxy. Both deduction and induction are a type of inference, which means reaching a conclusion based on evidence and reasoning. Deduction moves from idea to observation, while induction moves from observation to idea. Deduction is idea-first, followed by observations and a conclusion. The conclusion is always true as long as the premises are true.

Published on April 18, by Raimo Streefkerk. Revised on November 11, The main difference between inductive and deductive reasoning is that inductive reasoning aims at developing a theory while deductive reasoning aims at testing an existing theory.

Inductive research approach

The process of thinking about something, in a rational manner, so as to draw valid conclusions, is known as Reasoning. It is a daily activity that we use to make decisions, which involves the construction of thoughts and converting them into a proposition to give reasons on why we have opted for a particular alternative over the other. Reasoning logic can take two forms — inductive reasoning or deductive reasoning. The inductive reasoning follows a particular flow or behaviour so as to make inferences. Conversely, deductive reasoning uses available information, facts or premises to arrive at a conclusion. These two logics are exactly opposite to each other. Still, they are often juxtaposed due to lack of adequate information.

Deductive vs. Inductive

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